NOV
16
2

Plaintiffs say you don't need "One A Day"

Yet another class action lawsuit has been filed by plaintiffs alleging they were scammed by a dietary supplement.  In this case the supplement is pharmaceutical giant Bayer's One A Day vitamins.

One A Days come in many different formulae, each aimed at a niche market. And I do mean "niche."  For example, there are One A Day vitamins formulated for women, petite women, women who have (or want?) active metabolisms or active minds and spirits, almost-women (female teens), post-menopausal women, women over age 50, pro women, and women who prefer their vitamins in gummie bear-type form ("Women's Vita-Crave Gummies"). For the gummie bear afficianado, in addition to the women's gummies, there are men's "Vita Crave" gummies, sour gummies, gummies plus immunity support and regular gummies.  So if you are a petitie post-menopausal woman over 50 with an active metabolism, mind and spirit (or would like those characteristics) who enjoys both sweet and sour gummie bears and needs immunity support, you have lots of choices.  

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Recent Comments
DevoutCatalyst
May the floodgates open. Dietary supplement chasing lawyers will bolster respect for the profession.
Monday, 17 November 2014 00:26
DevoutCatalyst
May the floodgates open. Dietary supplement chasing lawyers will bolster respect for the profession.
Monday, 17 November 2014 00:26
4918 Hits
FEB
15
2

A bit of disinfectant sunshine for Hawaiian naturopaths

A couple of weeks ago, we lauded Hawaii State Senator Josh Green, MD, who introduced a bill (Senate Bill 2577) requiring naturopaths to have the same education and training as MDs and DOs in order to prescribe drugs.  Drugs require a prescription for good reason. You can sicken, even kill, a patient if you don't know what you're doing. 

I did a bit of Googling and was shocked to find just how little exposure to prescribing drugs naturopathic students have in their clinical training.  In fact, they don't have much clinical training at all, in anything. The Council on Naturopathic Medical Education, the accrediting agency for naturopathic "medical" schools, requires the equivalent of what would amount to about 20 days worth of an MD or DO seeing patients in an average family practice clinic.  That's all the clinical training naturopaths need to graduate.  And they don't even do residencies, unlike MD and DO family practice doctors, who must complete a three additional years before going into practice.  

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Alan
"...unlike MD and DO family practice doctors, who must complete a three additional years before going into practice." However, you... Read More
Monday, 10 November 2014 17:25
Alan
"...unlike MD and DO family practice doctors, who must complete a three additional years before going into practice." However, you... Read More
Monday, 10 November 2014 17:25
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FEB
05
6

Bring Out Your Science

Peasant Woman: Well, how’d you become a doctor, then? King Arthur: The Homeopathic Lady of the Lake, her arm clad in the purest shimmering samite, held aloft Excalibur from the bosom of the water, signifying by divine providence that I, Arthur, was to carry Excalibur. That is why I am your doctor. Dennis the Peasant: Listen. Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of medicine. Supreme medical power derives from scientific inquiry, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony. Arthur: Be quiet! Dennis the Peasant: You can’t expect to wield medical power just ’cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!

Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Sort of.

Good satire can be indistinguishable from reality. The Onion does it all the time and sometimes their articles show up in my feed and I think they are legitimate.

When I saw the headline “Prince Charles tells skeptics “Be more scientific except homeopathy” at first I thought it was legit. It wasn’t. But it close enough to reality that it could have been.

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Alan
Once you resort to name calling, you have already lost the argument. What happened to the scientific approach? Prove it wrong if y... Read More
Monday, 10 November 2014 17:28
Alan
Once you resort to name calling, you have already lost the argument. What happened to the scientific approach? Prove it wrong if y... Read More
Monday, 10 November 2014 17:28
Guest — Alan
Actually, it is incumbant upon the CAM community to prove that CAM works. Not the other way around. That is the scientific appro... Read More
Friday, 12 December 2014 18:27
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FEB
03
0

Good news, bad news for Coloradans

Last year, legislation passed in Colorado permitting naturopathic doctors who graduate from naturopathic "medical schools" to practice. All the usual pseudo-scientific naturopathic diagnoses and treatments are allowed.  Coloradans will now find themselves diagnosed with diseases of which they were previously unaware, such as chronic yeast overgrowth and adrenal fatigue. The reason for their new diagnoses is not some medical breakthrough, but the fact that NDs made up them up.  Having created these diseases, the NDs can then proceed to treat patients with the faux diagnoses with dietary supplements, homeopathy, colonic irrigation and the like. They can also employ real prescription drugs as long as the drugs are listed on the naturopathic formulary.

Another bill passed which allows pretty much anyone (convicted felons included) to practice medicine. Except they don't call it "medicine."  They call it "complementary and alternative health care services." The bill provides a safe harbor from prosecution for the unlicensed practice of medicine. No education or training is required to offer these services.  In fact, the practitioner can simply make up a treatment and legally sell it to the public. Or he could employ a ready-made fabrication like reiki, therapeutic touch, iridology and the like. 

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4592 Hits
JAN
27
0

A Hawaiian Senator who gets it and other legislative updates

There were just a few bills added to our roster this week, but it does include that rare attempt to actually curb the normally expansive scope of practice enjoyed by CAM practitioners.  

Hawaii licenses naturopaths who graduated from an accredited naturopathic "medical school" and allows them a broad scope of practice.  Unfortunately, this includes prescription privileges for drugs listed in a formulary devised by the naturopathic board. And there are some real drugs in this formulary, including anti-depressants, steroids, anti-coagulants, and drugs for impotence. With additional training, naturopaths can administer drugs IV and IM.  This being naturopathy, injection privileges includes glandulars

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5262 Hits
JAN
14
0

Advocacy

One advantage CAM practitioners (chiropractors, acupuncturists, naturopaths and the like) have over science-based medicine practitioners is the ability to make things up and pretend they are real. They can then sell these creations to the public as health care. State licensing of CAM practitioners helps tremendously in marketing this pseudo-medicine, especially when the product itself is enshrined in state law.

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