ND's licensed in Massachusetts. Medical Schools Beat Them to Pseudo-Science.

ND's licensed in Massachusetts. Medical Schools Beat Them to Pseudo-Science.

Last week the Governor of Massachusetts signed into law bill 2335 establishing a Naturopathy Board. As noted by the American Council on Science and Health, Massachusetts is now the 20th state where the legislature has legalized Naturopathic pseudo-scientific harm.

As someone who has spent more of my life in Massachusetts than in any other state, being fortunate to work in world class scientific and medical institutions, I am dissappointed in my home state and concerned about the growing influence that naturopaths are having on people's health across the country.

The Massachusetts Medical Society was also less than happy, saying in a press release.

The establishment of licensure for naturopathy is disappointing, as licensing is likely to be perceived by the public as an endorsement of an area of care that lacks rigorous medical training and standards of care, and offers few if any treatments based on clinical and scientific evidence.

But you do not need Naturopaths to get treatments that lack clinical and scientific evidence. Just check out the 4 medical schools in Massachusetts:

The Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, a collaboration between Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, offers acupuncture, chiropractic care, craniosacral therapy, and dietary herbs, vitamins and supplements.

The Boston University School of Medicine offers acupuncture and the Buteyko Breathing Method.

Tufts? The have partnered with the New England School of Acupuncture and offer Acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Pseudo-medicine, reiki and Chinese massage to

assist your body in balancing its energetic system

And not to be outdone, the University of Massachusetts Medical School offers acupuncture, cupping, functional medicine, GuaSha, natural therapies and Osteopathic Manipulation.

I sure hope that since these pseudo-medicines are offered by some the premier medical schools in the US that they are not perceived by the public as an endorsement of an area of care that lacks rigorous medical training and standards of care.  Oh no. 

There is no practical difference, as Dr. Neides of the Cleveland Clinic amply demonstrated last week, between the pseudo-science of an MD and the pseudo-science of an ND. The only differ by a letter in their title. 

Points of Interest 01/18/2017
Points of Interest 01/17/2017

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