JUN
20
4

Cancer quack Brian Clement: canceled in Ireland, protested in the UK

American cancer quack Brian Clement apparently thought he could chum up more business in Europe, so he headed across the pond. Unfortunately for him, the skeptics were waiting in ambush.  

Clement's events were cancelled in Ireland when his venues discovered his sordid history, thanks to protests by the Cork Skeptics, who were warned of his coming by the UK's Good Thinking Society. The Society is also protesting upcoming appearances in London and Birmingham. Tickets for the UK events are over $100 (US). True to form, according to the Daily Mail,

ticket buyers are promised that diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, MS and diabetes can be 'altered, prevented and at times conquered'.

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Guest — khiladi Kumar
Packers and movers India is well-known to be the best broker of packers and movers in the area of India due to their devoted solut... Read More
Friday, 08 July 2016 11:04
Guest — khiladi Kumar
The textile companies are very well-known in the area of Ahmadabad that it has been known as ‘textile hub’ as whole nation goes th... Read More
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Guest — khiladi Kumar
This town has excellent industrial sectors and many IT organizations providing a lot of opportunities for aspiring job seekers, li... Read More
Friday, 08 July 2016 11:05
6148 Hits
JUN
14
7

FDA finds raw pet food distasteful

The FDA recently announced it would send field staff out to collect samples of commercially-manufactured raw dog and cat food. The samples will be analyzed for SalmonellaListeria monocytogenes and E. coli, all of which have been found in raw pet food, in the animals who eat it, in their feces, on their bodies after eating it, in the areas they inhabit, and on their owner's bodies. Not surprisingly, this has led to both pet and human infection and illness.  If the FDA finds pathogens, it could result in a recall, press release and Reportable Food Registry Submission.

Why is this necessary? Some pet owners, egged on by a certain element in the "holistic" veterinarian community, desire a more "natural" diet for their pets. This is based on the fallacy that, the facts of evolution aside, dogs are really wolves (and cats are tiny tigers?) who eat uncooked meat in the wild. So you should let your dog's inner wolf run wild and dig into some nice, juicy raw meat. Proponents point out, as further "proof," that feral dogs and cats eat uncooked meat, as if these creatures have consciously chosen a healthy lifestyle instead of being left to appalling circumstances by irresponsible pet owners. And even your house cat may indulge in the occasional bird. (Thereby contributing to the decimation of the songbird population, by the way.) For good measure, they throw in some anti-corporate rhetoric, making the pet food industry look like Big Pharma's first cousin. 

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Guest — Brennen McKenzie
The raw diet fad is all too alive and well among alternative vets and pet owners. Evidence of risks, especially infectious disease... Read More
Tuesday, 16 June 2015 01:29
Dr. Raymond G. Whitham
"........This combination of ingredients offers optimum levels of...........natural-occurring enzymes........."This is a catchy ph... Read More
Tuesday, 16 June 2015 03:23
Guest — Emily
In the spirit of SBM, you should rethink the claim re: cats and the *decimation* of the song bird population (see e.g., http://vox... Read More
Tuesday, 16 June 2015 11:17
10322 Hits
JUN
07
0

Chiropractors down 1-9 in bottom of the ninth

The 2015 legislative sessions have ended in many states and others are drawing to a close in June. (Some legislative sessions are longer and a legislatures meet year-round, but we're not concerned about those here.) Chiropractors, as is usual, had a number of practice expansion and other favorable bills introduced across the country. So far, nine didn't pass and one remains pending, but only by the skin of its teeth. One bill unfavorable to practice expansion didn't pass, giving chiropractors their sole victory for this season. 

First, the win: In a rare pushback against chiropractic scope expansion, a bill was introduced in Idaho repealing a rule of the state Board of Chiropractic Examiners allowing chiropractors to prescribe, sell and compound vitamins, minerals, herbal medicines, homeopathic remedies and glandulars. In case you aren't familiar with glandulars, they are made from animal organs sourced in slaughterhouses and are prescribed by naturopaths and chiropractors for fake diseases, such a "adrenal fatigue," and other uses. In addition to the gigantic "ickiness" factor, they are unsafe and pose a risk of contracting "mad cow" disease. Unfortunately, the bill didn't pass.

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3824 Hits
JUN
04
0

Check it out: VaxAdvocacy.org tracks state vaccination bills

One of the bright spots during the 2015 state legislative sessions has been the introduction of bills curbing or eliminating non-medical vaccination exemptions. Now there's a website that tracks this legislation: VaxAdvocacy.org.  It also tracks other immunization-related bills, like those requiring daycare workers to be vaccinated. Here's how they describe themselves:

VaxAdvocacy.org is a website provided by parents who who want to help others speak up for sensible science-based public health policy.

Sensible science-based health policy! That is a sight for sore eyes for someone like me, who regularly slugs through state bills granting naturopaths, chiropractors, acupuncturists and assorted quacks of one stripe or another the authority to do things that should never be allowed. Like calling themselves primary care physicians (all the better to discourage vaccination), or allowing them to diagnose and treat fake diseases, give people colonics, treat patients with homeopathic remedies (including homeopathic vaccines) or bruise them all over for no good reason. 

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3551 Hits
MAY
31
0

Nevada Legislature passes "Quack Full Employment Act"

The Nevada Legislature just passed a "Quack Full Employment Act." The official purpose of this legislation is to protect purveyors of "wellness services" from prosecution for the unlicensed practice of medicine or some other health care practice, like chiropractic or massage, for which a state license is required. But the actual effect will be to prevent the state from bringing charlatans to justice for their actions. It's not the law until the Governor signs it, but it passed overwhelmingly in the Assembly and Senate, so we have no reason to think he won't.

And what are these "wellness services?" Some are simply worthless, but likely benign, the most pernicious side effect being lightening of the wallet, like: 

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4288 Hits
MAY
23
0

Caffeine Powder: a deadly dietary supplement

Caffeine powder sounds innocent enough, right? After all, it's "natural" and we drink caffeine in coffee and sodas all the time. But taking pure caffeine powder is not like going to Starbucks. A 100-gram package contains as much caffeine as 400 "tall" cups of Starbucks coffee, or 1,250 Red Bull energy drinks, or 3,000 cans of Coke. A mere 10 grams, or about 2/3 of a tablespoon, is a lethal dose for an adult.

Last year, two young men died after overdosing on caffeine powder. One was an 18-year-old high school student trying to stay awake for class projects coming due. Another was a newlywed, recently graduated from college. Their deaths were a wake-up call to the FDA. 

Because caffeine powder is sold as a dietary supplement, the FDA has no pre-market regulatory oversight. It must play catch-up after the damage is done. In December, 2014, the FDA issued a Consumer Advisory on Pure Powered Caffeine, warning the public not to consume it. The FDA notes that it is almost impossible to measure powdered caffeine accurately with common kitchen measuring tools, making it easy to consume an overdose. They also warn of the effects:

Symptoms of caffeine overdose can include rapid or dangerously erratic heartbeat, seizures and death. Vomiting, diarrhea, stupor and disorientation are also symptoms of caffeine toxicity.

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4306 Hits
MAY
16
1

Bills tightening immunization requirements move forward in several states

The California Senate voted by a wide margin to end the state's personal belief and religious exemptions to childhood immunizations on Thursday. The measure now moves to the Assembly and a new round of hearings, which promise to be contentious. If passed, California would become only the third state in the country allowing only medical exemptions. 

Supporters made several compromises to get the bill through.  Immunizations are limtied to 10 in number, but the state has some wiggle room to add more. Gone is a requirement in the original bill that the state notify parents of school immunization rates. The bill exempts home-schooled and independent study students. The bill's authors say they will agree to grandfather in about 13,000 students not fully immunized, a move seen as placating some of the vociferous opposition to the bill. 

Opponents vow to simply move with the bill over to the Assembly and continue their efforts. One opponent was quoted by the San Jose Mercury News:

"The only thing we can do is continue to educate our officials" about the personal belief exemption, said Lisa Bakshi, a mother from Placer County. "The parents who do it now do it for very legitimate reasons. We don't do it because we are uninformed."

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Janet Camp
Mostly good news, especially California!
Wednesday, 20 May 2015 00:02
4984 Hits
MAY
10
0

ICA again says "no" to drugs in chiropractic practice

The International Chiropractors Association (ICA) lobbed another volley a few days ago in the ongoing war between the straight and mixer factions of chiropractic. Actually, "straight" and "mixer" hardly begins to describe the full spectrum of practices available from one or another chiropractor, from those who stick to the "detection and correction" of the mythical subluxation all the way through to those who fancy themselves as primary care physicians lacking only access to an expansive pharmaceutical formulary via the largesse of state legislators. It is this latter group, which seems to have taken over the leadership of the American Chiropractic Association (ACA), that most concerns the ICA. 

Only 3 months ago, in "Chiropractic drug wars heat up again," SFSBM chronicled the latest battle, brought on the pending establishment of a College of Chiropractic Pharmacology and Toxicology. (You will find links to a full history of this intrafraternal war in the post.) This is a key element in the ACA's newly announced plan to push for revision of the state chiropractic practice acts. (Part of the ACA's "Six Key Elements of A Modern Chiropractic Practice Act") These revisions would give the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE), their educational accrediting agency, the full authority to decide the chiropractic scope of practice, a function normally reserved to the states. Of course, the ACA doesn't come out and say this point blank. What they do say is that the revised practice acts should include:

Scope of Practice Determined by Doctoral and Post-Doctoral Education, Training and Experience Obtained Through Appropriately Accredited Institutions.

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3720 Hits
MAY
03
2

Florida files second complaint against Brian Clement

Brian Clement, who runs the Hippocrates Health Clinic in West Palm Beach, Florida, has a sordid history of cancer quackery. Actually, his expertise in quackery extends beyond cancer treatments, but cancer seems to be something of a specialty of his.

Clement's exploits were expertly chronicled in the Canadian media (more links here). (Florida media, having engaged in some pathetically credulous coverage of Clement, picked up the scent only after the Canadians had done all of the prep work for them.)  His modus operandi is to give lectures as an "expert" in "natural" cancer treatments, preying on the desperately ill and their families by attracting them with claims that treatment at Hippocrates can "reverse" cancer and "heal" cancer and and other diseases.

Clement's notoriety in Canada grew out of one of these lectures. He overblown claims attracted two families, who withdrew their girls from conventional cancer treatment in favor of, among other things, a visit to Hippocrates. This cost about $18,000 each, some of it from community fundraising.  Sadly, but not surprisingly, one of the girls died. Fortunately, the other girl restarted chemotherapy and has a chance to live.

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Recent Comments
Janet Camp
Is it the loopholes in the law or lack of backbone? Unless states go after these creeps with a vengance, they will continue on the... Read More
Tuesday, 05 May 2015 23:39
Guest — Beth
Unfortunately homeopathic remedies are a type of religion to their followers. As long as they believe in it facts be damned. Curre... Read More
Wednesday, 10 June 2015 16:02
5868 Hits
APR
26
2

Is patient satisfaction fueling "integrative medicine?"

A thoughtful article recently appeared in The Atlantic titled "The Problem with Satisfied Patients," by Alexandra Robbins.  As she explains, the Department of Health and Human Services, probably with the best of intentions, decided that Medicare reimbursement would be based, in part, on patient satisfaction survey scores. Medicare now withholds a percentage of reimbursement and hospitals "earn" it back by getting high scores.

Low satisfaction scores can hurt the bottom line. Naturally, hospitals began to implement measures to up their scores, from scripting nurses' interactions with patients to advertising for nurses with "good customer-service skills."  Some have added valet parking, live music, custom-order meals and VIP lounges for patients in their "loyalty programs."

Thanks, but no thanks, on that last one, considering the qualifications. Better to accumulate frequent flyer miles than frequent hospital patient points. 

But as one clinical instructor interviewed by Robbins noted:

Patients can be very satisfied and be dead an hour later.

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Riley Williams II
And they had to call the survey HCAHPS. I deal with HCAP patients all day and I get confused when my boss starts discussing HCAHPS... Read More
Monday, 27 April 2015 16:27
Janet Camp
My regional medical center has these surveys (I refuse to do them) and it’s not tied to anything integrative. They want to know if... Read More
Wednesday, 29 April 2015 19:43
5095 Hits
APR
19

Chiropractors managing herpes?

The National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) periodically conducts a survey of chiropractors to see what they do in their practices. The NBCE's Practice Analysis of Chiropractic 2015 is out now and provides an intriguing inside look at this insular group of health care practitioners. The survey certainly deserves more than one look, but I provide some initial observations here.

First, the Analysis is not good news for the group of chiropractors trying to rebrand themselves as primary care physicians.  In actual practice, they hardly ever see the diseases and conditions the average MD or DO PCP would diagnose and refer or treat. For example, asthma, COPD, respiratory infections, colitis, ulcers, UTIs, angina, thyroid disorders, anemia, menopausal issues, and ENT disorders were seen once or twice a year, and in some cases not even that frequently.

Yet, with a hubris that far exceeds their actual experience with these problems, they reported in many cases that they "co-managed" these issues with other health care professionals. Chiropractors virtually never saw a case of appendicitis, yet reported that they co-managed 21% of these cases and managed 5.1% by themselves. (Surely that is a statistical anomaly and a chiropractor didn't actually manage a case of appendicitis!) They saw less than 1 case per year of herpes simplex or herpes zoster, but co-managed almost half of the cases.

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Guest — HerpesFish
Does Chiropractors really manage herpes?
Monday, 20 April 2015 03:54
Alex
Greetings to the general public, i want to inform the public how i was cured of HERPES Simplex Virus by a Doctor called Osas. i v... Read More
Tuesday, 21 April 2015 23:29
10921 Hits
APR
12
0

California Sen. Block working at cross-purposes supporting both vaccination and NDs

California Senator Marty Block is a co-author of a wonderful bill that would eliminate personal belief exemptions to childhood immunizations. This means that a misinformed parent who objects to vaccinating her child based on . . . well, actually, based on nothing, could no longer visit her poor decision-making on her child by refusing immunization.  California currently allows a parent to deprive her children of immunization against infectious diseases by simply stating that her personal beliefs tell her it's the right thing to do, even when all the evidence says otherwise.  

Hence the terrible outbreak of measles in California, now spreading to the rest of the country, where children made vulnerable to disease because of their parents' personal beliefs are suffering for their parents' choices. To my knowledge, the parents themselves are not coming down with the measles, only their unvaccinated children. 

Current law requiring immunization of all school children, except for those with medical and personal belief exemptions, applies to any public or private elementary or secondary school, child care center, day nursery, nursery school, family day care home, or development center. As introduced, Senate Bill 277 would have exempted home-schooled children from mandatory vaccination required for school attendace if the children were all members of the same family. The bill was amended in committee and that exception is now eliminated. 

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7166 Hits
APR
05
0

Naturopaths de-licensed in Idaho, practice expansion nixed in North Dakota

April 2 was a terrible, horrible, no-good, very bad day for naturopaths, only without the heart-warming ending.

First, not only did an expansive licensing bill fail to pass in Idaho, naturopaths were actually de-licensed by the Idaho Legislature.  I suppose the Governor could veto the de-licensing bill, but there are no indications that he will. After all, only 5 of the 100 Idaho naturopaths are actually licensed. 

Idaho first licensed naturopathic "doctors" in 2005.  Because of difficulties that aren't quite clear to me, the licensing statute was never fully implemented. The naturopaths tried to remedy that for several years but failed each time. This year, they came roaring back with an expansive licensing bill.  As always, licensing turned into a bone of contention between the traditional naturopaths and those who have degrees from naturopathic "medical" schools. 

House Bill 181, pretentiously titled "The Naturopathic Medical Physicians Practicing Act," offered an entirely new iteration of the naturopath.  Gone was the usual statutory language defining naturopathy in terms of the "body's self-healing ability," i.e., vitalism.  "Naturopathic medicine" was defined as "a distinct and comprehensive system of primary health care practiced by naturopathic physicians" and "natural health care services" as a "broad domain" including "diagnosis and treatment," but left the content of naturopathic practice largely up to a Board of Naturopathic "Physicians" using the vague standard that the practices permitted by the new law must be "consistent with naturopathic education and training."

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16293 Hits
MAR
28
3

Florida retracts cease and desist order and fine against Brian Clement

In February, the State of Florida issued an order telling Brian Clement to cease and desist from the unlicensed practice of medicine. It ordered him to pay a fine as well. In March, the State said "never mind!" In an e-mail to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, the Department of Health said:

"After further review of the investigative materials, it was determined that there is insufficient evidence to pursue further legal action in this matter."

It's hard to imagine what the Department might consider sufficient evidence, considering the sorry legacy of Mr. Clement and his visits to Canada, where he lured the families of two Canadian girls suffering from cancer to his West Palm Beach clinic, the Hippocrates Health Institute. Both families withdrew the girls from chemotherapy and conventional medical treatment in favor of traditional aboriginal medicine and the quackery offered at Hippocrates. One of the girls later died. The other, according to the CBC, remains on a Clement-prescribed raw foods diet

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Guest — brenda hill
Not surprised. I, a Canadian, tried to alert Florida health authorities to an upcoming presentation in Miami by Jim Humble's Genes... Read More
Sunday, 29 March 2015 20:32
jeepers creepers
Not surprised. I, (a Canadian), tried to alert Florida authorities to an upcoming Dec 2014 Miami presentation from Jim Humble's Ge... Read More
Sunday, 29 March 2015 21:16
Firth Forth
I'm really sorry to learn that the medical board backed down. I'm sure a lot of work went into filing those complaints-its despica... Read More
Tuesday, 31 March 2015 05:10
12769 Hits
MAR
22
2

Will Minnesota require "misinformed consent" for vaccination?

A favorite tactic of anti-vaccination ideologues is the "informed consent" gambit.  By exaggerating adverse effects of vaccines, anti-vaccinationists can scare patients or parents into refusing immunization for themselves or their children.  SFSBM Board chairman David Gorski calls this tactic "misinformed consent," and rightly so. 

It is therefore with skepticism that I view House Bill 1978 and Senate Bill 1870 (the bills are identical) recently introduced in the Minnesota Legislature. The bills have several suspicious provisions which seem tailor-made to raise unfounded parental alarm.

First, the bills require health care providers (physicians, PAs and APRNs) to give patients, or their parents, vaccine information statements from the CDC. No problem there. But the providers must also give them

information provided by the manufacturer with the vaccine, including the package insert . . .

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Recent Comments
Jason Brown
Thanks for the heads up. Will be contacting my legislators.
Sunday, 22 March 2015 22:02
Dorit Reiss
They tried to add this as an amendment to the recent bill adding an educational requirement to the Personal Belief Exemption. It's... Read More
Monday, 23 March 2015 19:30
4950 Hits
MAR
15
1

A Curiosity: Bastyr announces Masters of Public Health Degree

Bastyr University offers degrees in naturopathy, acupuncture and Oriental medicine and Ayurvedic "sciences."  Among the subjects taught in these programs are homeopathy, lectures and labs in "meridians and points," and massage.

Here, for example, is a description of Ayurvedic Body Systems 2, from the Ayurvedic Sciences degree program:

This course presents additional concepts of ayurvedic anatomy, including a deeper understanding of Doshas within the areas of organs, systems and nadis, srotas (channels). It also explores the depth of the three attributes (Satva, Rajas and Tamas) in addition to how each governs the mind and emotions. Also addressed are Agni (Fire) — its types, its function, its importance in health and disease — and Ojas (Natural vitality, vigor, immunity) — its function and signs of increase or decrease.

And here is a description of the qi gong course, from the Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine degree program:

Qi gong refers to the building, harnessing and proper directing of qi (energy.) Through proper exercise and instruction, students experience qi gong as a valuable resource for self healing and building energy.

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Janet Camp
“ Their public health degrees are less likely to be accepted by employers (or accepted at all) and they will be viewed with skepti... Read More
Wednesday, 18 March 2015 16:47
9970 Hits
MAR
07
0

Chiropractic drug wars heat up again

The International Chiropractors Association is once again girding itself for battle with its brethren in the American Chiropractic Association over chiropractic scope of practice.

The ICA represents the "straight," or pure subluxation-based, chiropractors. The ACA, on the other hand, started off as an organization representing the "mixers," those who incorporated diagnoses and treatments beyond the "detection" and "correction" of the non-existent subluxation via spinal "adjustments."  It was this branch that briefly held the promise of moving chiropractic beyond pseudoscience and into some form of evidence-based musculoskeletal specialty with a concentration on back problems. This transition might not ever have happened, considering what they were up against, but a few chiropractors evidently tried. 

Hopes of  a progression from pseudoscientific cult to mainstream practice has been pretty much dashed by overreachers, who have concocted a grand scheme to rebrand chiropractors as primary care physicians. This effort has been met with resistance by an odd-bedfellows combination of straight chiropractors (the ICA), medical doctors and pharmacists. 

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11205 Hits
MAR
01
4

New Mexico chiropractors move closer to expanded prescription privileges

New Mexico chiropractors are moving closer to their dream of becoming primary care physicians.  Not by dint of having actually passed the medical school admissions test, graduation from medical school, passing board exams and completing 3 years of residency, where they would learn how to care for patients in clinical settings. No, not by a long shot. 

New Mexico chiropractors, with certain qualifications we'll get to in a minute, could do the following if a new Senate Bill passes:

prescribe, administer, inject and dispense dangerous drugs that are used in a standard primary care practice.

The bill would except only Schedule I and II controlled substances. 

They are attempting to do this by legislative fiat, not education and hard work. Which is how chiropractors typically do things. Want to detect and correct the non-existent chiropractic subluxation? Get all 50 states to pass chiropractic practice act allowing it.  Want to be paid by insurers for your services, even though you are known for pseudoscientific diagnoses and treatments?  Get the state legislatures to mandate insurance coverage. 

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Janet Camp
My flabber is totally gasted. Is it too awful to look forward to someone being killed by these ministrations so that the legislatu... Read More
Tuesday, 03 March 2015 15:57
Guest — Bill Jones
Apparently the author is ok with a Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner, both with much lower levels of education than a Doct... Read More
Monday, 19 October 2015 22:59
Guest — jo
This article is very biased. Very poorly written.
Tuesday, 11 October 2016 06:46
12238 Hits
FEB
14
2

What measles epidemic? Legislators move to increase vaccine exemptions.

You can't turn on the news or pick up a newspaper or go online without hearing about the measles epidemic. Or learning how liberal "personal belief" exemptions are helping spread the disease.  

So you'd think the possibility of bad PR alone would deter a legislator from introducing a bill to create a personal belief or religious exemption to vaccination in states where none exists. Unfortunately, you would be wrong. 

Mississippi and West Virginia are the only two states in the nation that do not allow religious or personal belief exemptions for children attending school. (They do allow medical exemptions.) In media coverage of the epidemic, Mississippi has been widely admired for its exemplary vaccination rate, the highest in the nation. And this in a state that usually tops the charts for poor health stats.

So what did Mississippi Rep. Mark Formby and Sen. Chris McDaniel go and do?  They introduced bills in the Mississippi House and Senate to create a personal belief exemption. All the parent would have to do is give a letter to school authorities stating which vaccinations haven't been given because they are "contrary to his or her beliefs." The "his" and "her" refer to the parents, not the child. Children don't get a say in whether they want to be protected from diseases or risk permanent injury and possibly death because of parental "beliefs," no matter how ill-informed the parent is. 

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Guest — MSresident
You'll be glad to know the MS bill died in committee.
Monday, 16 February 2015 18:04
Guest — MSresident
You'll be glad to know the MS bill died in committee.
Monday, 16 February 2015 18:04
7614 Hits
FEB
08
2

Weaponized acupuncturists stake claim in Wyoming

The folks in Wyoming have always seemed to me a pretty hardy bunch.  But are they ready for bleeding? I'm not talking about the kind of bleeding you do when you, say, fall off your horse.  I'm talking about totally gratuitous bleeding, the kind that results when an acupuncturist stabs you with a lancet.  For no good reason, and intentionally.  

Bleeding is an "ancient" treatment, which in the warped reasoning of CAM practitioners, automatically makes it a good idea. "Western" medicine gave up bleeding patients in the 1800s when the idea that the body's condition was governed by the four humors fell by the wayside. The thinking went that bleeding would rid the patient of an excess of one of the humors, thereby restoring "balance." 

According to the Director of the Institute for Traditional Medicine in Portland, OR, bleeding at peripheral points around the body had all sorts of uses in ancient "Eastern" medicine: sore throats, mental disorders, infantile convulsions, cardiac pain, enuresis -- you name it. But . . .

Blood-letting is a method of therapy that is difficult to explain in modern terms. Aside from the traditional theoretical basis for these treatments in letting out heat and excess factors, a key issue is whether it actually produces the claimed effects. Many Western acupuncturists have stated informally that they get dramatic results from this treatment method, but, unfortunately, there is no evidence presented to support such contentions.

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Janet Camp
It’s tempting to ask what difference it makes what people get up to in Wyoming, but I have to remember there are innocent children... Read More
Monday, 09 February 2015 03:14
Janet Camp
It’s tempting to ask what difference it makes what people get up to in Wyoming, but I have to remember there are innocent children... Read More
Monday, 09 February 2015 03:14
7960 Hits